Assessment of Health Promotion Needs and Cultural and Traditional Practices of Qalipu First Nation Members

A person holding a Red Apple with engraved heart

Members Wanted as Participants for a Research Study

During the 60 years that passed before the recognition of Qalipu First Nation in 2011, our people experienced a loss from their cultural and traditional practices. Being an off-reserve landless Band makes us unique from other First Nations and, according to what some may say, may be responsible for a grassroots disconnection.

Research indicates that culture impacts individual and community health, as it influences interaction with the health care system and engagement in health programs and services (National Aboriginal Health Organization, 2008). In both the Federation of Newfoundland Indians Health Needs Assessment (2010) and Qalipu First Nation’s Healing Waters Study (2015), members indicated that culture was important to them in terms of overall health, and they identified a need for more culturally appropriate health initiatives.

To further investigate these findings, Qalipu First Nation’s Health Division is conducting a research study that will assess our members’ needs for health promotion initiatives, and help us gain a better understanding of their cultural and traditional practices with respect to health.

Survey participants will be asked to answer questions about what their needs are for health promotion initiatives, as well as what aspects of Mi’kmaq culture and traditions are most significant to them. Survey data will be collected through on-line, paper format, or through face-to-face or telephone interviews. Paper format surveys will be mailed out to members at their request. Face-to-face and telephone interviews will be conducted by a researcher. The on-line and paper format surveys will take 10-30 minutes to complete; face-to-face and telephone interviews may take up to 90 minutes.

To participate in this study, participants must be a registered member of Qalipu First Nation and be at least 18 years of age. They must be able to communicate in the English language.

Participants who complete the survey may benefit by participating in this survey by feeling that their opinions and desires regarding health promotion initiatives have been heard. Subsequently, they may be more inclined to engage in health promotion initiatives due to QFN integrating an approach in health promotion activities that are suited towards Mi’kmaq cultural and traditional practices. It is also possible that the benefits of this study may result in improved health outcomes of Qalipu First Nation members.

To learn more about or participate in this research study, please contact Jenna Osmond, Manager of Health, Qalipu First Nation.

 Jenna Osmond, Manager of Health Services, Qalipu First Nation
Telephone: (709) 634-5041