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National Aboriginal Day Prayer for the People

Kwe’ Kis’ulk, Creator

Tomorrow we celebrate National Aboriginal Day, a day dedicated for all Canadians to celebrate the contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples to our communities, our provinces and to the development of our country.  From coast to coast to coast, we celebrate together.

This year marks 20 years since National Aboriginal Day was created.  This national day of recognition is the result of consultations and statements of support for such a day made by various Indigenous groups.  This demonstrates that when we work together, and unite our voices with a common goal, we can accomplish great things.  Thank you Creator for those who have gone before us and made such a day of celebration an annual event that we look forward to and cherish.

Special events and gatherings have been scheduled for several of our communities across the island.  I encourage everyone to take this opportunity to share in the fun and the pride of our unique heritage, diverse cultures, and outstanding contributions of the indigenous peoples of Canada.

Creator, please bless this special day for the benefit of all Canadians.

Msit No’kmaq,

Chief Brendan Mitchell

Please click here to visit our events calendar to find out what’s happening in your area to mark this special day.

Back row, L-R: Stephen Rose, Monty Bath, Rodney Bennett, David Lucas, Roland Vivian, Donna John, Danny Stanford, Jonathan Strickland.  Front row, L-R Raymond Young, Martin Swyers, Melvin White, Robin Sheppard.

Qalipu Announces Enhancement to Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy

Ed Webb (retiring Guardian) and new trainee (replacement) Robin Sheppard
Ed Webb retired this year after more than 15 years of service.  Pictured here with his replacement, trainee Robin Sheppard

June 16, 2016, Corner Brook—Chief Brendan Mitchell of the Qalipu First Nation today announced an enhancement in funding for the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (AFS) to support the hiring of two additional Aboriginal Fishery Guardians in the central region. This was an important achievement for the new Chief, who at the start of his term approached the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) regarding the need for greater representation on central rivers, and to secure enhanced funding for AFS which had not seen an increase in nearly twenty years.

Chief Mitchell addressed the group of ten Guardians who were gathered along with DFO representatives and Qalipu Natural Resources (QNR) staff, in Corner Brook today for refresher training as the team begins their working season.

“The Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy is a very special program for us at Qalipu. Conservation is so important to all of us in the province, and your presence on our rivers helps prevent poaching and encourages sustainable use of our resources for future generations. I have a lot of respect for the work that you all do. This is why it was so important to me, not only to continue this program, but also to pursue expansion of it. I’m pleased to share with you all today that, after some negotiation, DFO has come through with additional funding to support the hiring of one additional Guardian in the central region.”

Chief Mitchell went on to say that for the safety of the Guardians who spend a lot of time working in and around water, it is best that they work in pairs of two. He noted that QNR will fund a second new position in Central to allow for that. Representation will now consist of six Guardians in western Newfoundland, and six in Central.

In addition to enforcement patrols, the Guardians collect scientific data that is fed into the Natural Resource division for analysis and reporting. For reliable planning, reporting, and understanding of our environment, raw data is essential. Data collected each year provides the possibility for long term monitoring, indicating changes over time. A number of QNR and MAMKA projects were made possible this year by the involvement of the AFS Guardians. In particular, projects pertaining to American eel, fresh water habitat obstruction removal, Invasive Species and research concerning Species at Risk.

The new Aboriginal Fishery Guardian Trainee positions are now listed on Qalipu.ca. For more information, please contact Jonathan Strickland, Manager of the Qalipu Natural Resource division by email at jstrickland@qalipu.ca

Health Poster Qalipu new dates

Qalipu Health Services Division Launches New Project

The Qalipu Health Services division is pleased to announce the launch of a new project, The Qalipu First Nation Chronic Disease Prevention and Self-Management Project. This initiative will see traditional and cultural resources integrated into the existing Improving Health My Way (IHMW) program currently offered by provincial regional health authorities. This project was made possible by the receipt of a $100,000 Health Service Integration Fund, awarded to Qalipu this year.

“Health services is an area where we see a lot of potential for growth for the Qalipu First Nation.” Noted Brendan Mitchell, Chief of the Band, “This project, and the partnerships formed with regional health authorities, government and other stakeholders, will be a valuable resource to the Band going forward. It will serve as a strong      foundation for future health promotion initiatives.”

Renée Dyer, Manager of the Qalipu Health Service division said that the existing program is a great opportunity for people of the province to better their health, and hopes that adding elements of culture and tradition will make it even more relevant, particularly for the Qalipu First Nation.

She said, “This program give people the self-empowerment skills and tools needed to manage chronic disease and improve their overall wellness and quality of life. Qalipu will build a supplementary resource that will integrate aspects of Mi’kmaq culture and traditional practices into the existing program, making it more engaging for our membership.”

Starting on July 13 and running every Wednesday for six weeks, Qalipu will deliver the IHMW program to members of the Band. It will be delivered at the Qalipu Community Room in Corner Brook and will be expanded to be delivered in in other Wards as project development continues.

Dyer added that in the fall, members who participated in the summer session, as well as general members of the band, will be engaged via consultations and a survey, to help identify cultural and traditional components that are unique to our First Nation and that can support the program when being delivered to Qalipu members.

For more information about this new initiative, contact Renée Dyer by email at rdyer@qalipu.ca.

To register for the Improving Health my Way program taking place this summer, please contact Victoria White at 637-5000, ext. 6689 or email selfmanagement@westernhealth.nl.ca

Click Here for more details on the Improving Health My Way Program

Media:
Alison White Communications Officer,
Qalipu First Nation tel. (709)634-5163
email awhite@qalipu.ca

Health 565

Kids Safety Event

In honour of Safe Kids Week 2016-Preventing Injuries At Home, At Play and On the Road, Qalipu First Nation will partner with Western Health (Corner Brook and Bay of Islands Primary Health Care Team) and the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary, Corner Brook division, to offer a safety event for our children and their caregivers.  The event will include interactive activities geared toward learning more about injury prevention, such as bicycle/helmet safety, playground safety, and safe practices at home.  The event will take place this coming Thursday, June 16, 6:00-8:00 PM at the Majestic Park in Corner Brook.  Light refreshments will be served.

Renée Dyer, Manager of the Qalipu Health Services division references a startling fact provided by Parachute, the organization responsible for initiating Safe Kids Week.  She said, “Many Canadians are surprised to learn that preventable injuries kill more children every year than any other disease.  Worst of all, a child dies every nine hours due to a preventable injury.  We hope that this event will make a small contribution toward improving awareness of preventable injuries.”

In the event of rain, the event will go ahead in the Qalipu Community Room, 1 Church St. (upper level).

For more information, please contact Renée Dyer at 634-5041 or email rdyer@qalipu.ca

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2015-2016 Audited Financial Statements

Qalipu First Nation recently completed our annual review for the 2015-2016 fiscal year. Chartered Accountants Bonnell Cole Janes have audited our financial operations and provided a report on their findings.

You can access the report here: 2015-2016 Audited Financial Statements

The details of the audited report, along with an overview of all QFN activities for the year, will be presented in full at Qalipu’s upcoming Annual General Assembly (AGA). The AGA will take place on June 25th at the Mount Peyton Hotel in Grand Falls-Windsor, 1:30-4:00.  The auditor will be on hand to answer any questions that you may have.

For members who have questions about the Financial Statements but are not able to attend the AGA, please feel free to contact Jodie Wells, Finance Manager, by email at jwells@qalipu.ca

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2015-2016 Annual Report

The Qalipu First Nation is pleased to share its Annual Report for the 2015-2016 fiscal year.  This report contains the audited financial statement, gives an overview of all activities from the three Departments of Qalipu, as well as provides insight into our Strategic Plan, and the 2015 Election.  It also includes messages from the Chief and CEO, a report from the Federation of Newfoundland Indians, and the Qalipu Business Trust.

The content of this report, and more, will be presented at the upcoming Annual General Assembly.  This meeting, open to all members of the Band, will take place on June 25th, 2016, 1:30-4:00 at the Mount Peyton in Grand Falls-Windsor.  Copies of the report will be available at the meeting.  Members are reminded to bring their Secure Card of Indian Status to register upon arrival.

Click Here to view the 2015-2016 Annual Report

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Elver Abundance Study Summary Report 2014

Anguilla rostrata has two juvenile stages, the elver and the glass eel. The glass eels migrate northward from the Sargasso Sea every year to reside in the fresh groundwater systems or the estuarine/brackish areas and return after maturation for breeding. The time at which it takes for eels to mature is dependent on both size and environmental conditions. This project was deigned to track temporal variance in abundance to indicate start, finish, and peak migration times of elvers and glass eels in Harry’s River, NL.

 

Click here to read more about this report

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Commercial Eel Harvest Monitoring 2014

Monitoring of the commercial eel harvest is an opportunistic practice that has been employed by Qalipu Mi’Kmaq First Nation Band for a number of years to collect, document or to track temporal variation/changes in the population dynamics of population information of the American eel (Anguilla rostrata). This includes individual weight, length, life stage ratio, and abnormalities such as red mouth and skin lesions. The American eel is a very culturally significant species for the Mi’kmaq people of Newfoundland. Along with being an important food source the American eel is also used for ceremonial and medicinal purposes. It is for these reasons that we are studying the local population in Muddy Hole, Western Newfoundland, and Little Horwood Brook, Central Newfoundland.

This project involves cooperating with local fish harvester’s in Western and Central Newfoundland and recording a number of biological characteristics of the eels captured by the harvester. Work was done through collaborating with local fish harvesters as to satisfy the community engagement portion of our Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy agreement. This opportunistic monitoring was beneficial to Qalipu, local harvesters and the eel population as additional nets were not set in the study areas. This reduced the amount of working hours required to complete the study, competition for catch with local harvesters, and stress on the eel population. Parks Canada employees also took part in monitoring at the western field site.

Click here to read more about this report

Atlantic Salmon Redd Surveys 2014 – 2015

Salmon Redd surveys are part of the atalantic salmon monitoring activities that Qalipu
conducts annually, alternating between the Western and Central portions of Newfoundland.
These redd surveys are completed to analyse recruitment and return of resident populations to
areas previously unaccessible due to freshwater obstructions (i.e. inactive beaver dams and log
jams). Salmon Redd surveys were completed during the month of November for Coal Brook,
Sheep Brook and Dribble Brook. These surveys have been ongoing for several years and have
included over 20 study areas within Western and Central Newfoundland. Throughout this time
the Guardians have become quite experienced in completing the surveys and have been able to
complete them efficiently and effectively.

 

Click here to read more about this report

Eelgrass 2014-2015

Spatial variation in the abundance of eelgrass (Zostera marina) at eight sites in western Newfoundland, Canada

The abundance of eelgrass (Zostera marina) was quantified at eight sites along the west coast of Newfoundland (NL), Canada. Two video procedures were employed to generate preliminary data on the percent cover of eelgrass. A GoPro high definition camera was mounted on a two meter 1.3cm diameter PVC pipe and attached 30 cm above a 19 x 19 cm quadrat. Still images were generated of quadrats or of the benthos during free swims. A 3 x 3 grid was added to the center of each image and the mean percent cover was calculated from these grids. The percent cover of eelgrass ranged between 5.89 and 69.27 %. Eelgrass abundance increased between June/July and September at sites 2, 4, and 7, before decreasing again in October at site 7. Overall, the percent cover of eelgrass peaked at 81.18% in September at site 4. Globally, sea grasses are declining in response to multiple stressors, including eutrophication, shoreline development, climate change, and aquatic invasive species. Eelgrass provides critical ecosystem services to coastal environments by stabilizing shorelines, contributing organic biomass to coastal food webs, and by increasing habitat heterogeneity along shallow subtidal shores. The degradation and loss of this highly productive habitat can have dire consequences for the stability and integrity of coastal environments in Atlantic Canada. Efforts to conserve this habitat will have long term benefits for populations of commercially, recreationally, and culturally important coastal species.

 

Click here to read more about this report