Member Log in Membership Username Password Concept

Update your Profile in the Qalipu Membership Database

Our membership database, ginu, is an essential tool for all members of the Band.  It allows QFN to stay in touch with its members for elections, email voting that may take place between elections, and to share general communications like special offers, newsletters and Messages from the Chief.  The database also allows members to complete their employment profile and opt to receive notice of employment opportunities and lets them identify if they’d like to be contacted regarding volunteer opportunities.

LOGGING IN

Logging in is easy.  From the top of our website, Qalipu.ca, click on GINU MEMBER LOGIN.  You will then see options:

  • logging in for the first time (new members) After agreeing to the terms and conditions, new members will be asked for their 10-digit status number (034xxxxxxx), their date of birth and will have to *create a password.
  • or already logged in once. If you’ve logged in once before, use your 10-digit status number and your password.

If a password is forgotten, or you have trouble logging in, please click forgot your password or call the support line 1-855-263-6440.

*Note: new passwords must be a minimum of 8 characters in length, contain an uppercase letter, contain a lowercase letter and contain a number.

Once you have logged in, you will see that your profile is organized into three parts: My Profile, My Employment Advantage and Communication Preferences.

MY PROFILE

We ask all members to fill out as much information as possible here, however there are several essential items we will need for all members of the Band.  All of these can be updated under the “My Profile” tab:

  • Email – we may email important information as often as once a week.
    • Message from the Chief
    • Email voting
    • Newsletter
    • Special offers
    • Events
    • Benefit, service and program updates
  • Mailing Address
    • Your voter information package will be sent through the mail
    • Your Electoral Ward is determined by your current mailing address if living in and around the Wards
    • Your Electoral Ward is determined by your Substantive Community Connection if you live outside the Wards.
  • Phone number
    • Telephone campaigns may be used to contact you regarding important issues and/or opportunities

MY EMPLOYMENT ADVANTAGE

Are you looking for employment? Qalipu First Nation is often in contact with employers and would like to help you find a job! One way that we do this is through the Employment Advantage feature in our database.

  • Sign up for the Employment Advantage Mailing List. If you would like to have Qalipu First Nation contact you on behalf of potential employers, agents, contracting individuals or entities regarding any new employment, business, or contractual opportunities, go to the Communication Preferences Tab and select that option.
  • Your Employee Profile contains resume information like education, training, certifications, and other information to help Qalipu understand the needs of our members from an employment point of view. We encourage you to complete as much of this information as possible whether you are currently seeking employment or not.  This information can be used to help guide our programs, services and program delivery.

COMMUNICATION PREFERENCES

  • Communication Consent Preferences. Add an email address and choose how you would like to be contacted.
    • First option = send me everything (programs, services, newsletters, events, announcements)
    • Second option = send me the essentials only! Sign up to receive emails regarding elections, e-voting, enrolment and important notices regarding your benefits
    • Third option = Employment Advantage: sign up to be contacted about jobs and training opportunities
    • Fourth option = Volunteer: sign up to receive notice about opportunities to volunteer
  • Member Live Stream. We are working toward making Council Meetings available by livestream.  Signing in to your ginu membership profile will be your access to these, and other members only viewing opportunities.
  • News from Qalipu.ca. All the Latest News is streamed here.

Questions? Please contact profile@qalipu.ca or call 1-855-263-6440

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Monitoring Climate Change – Call for Volunteers

The Qalipu Mi’kmaq First Nation Band is going to be monitoring climate change in your area and we need your help!

I’m Jasmine Pinksen, a Qalipu member, Master’s Student, and for this summer working with the Qalipu First Nation who will be assisting in completing the Talikiskik? (how’s the weather?) project. This project seeks to better understand climate change here in Newfoundland by setting up climate monitoring stations throughout NL and by getting your feedback and assistance.

Volunteers Needed!

It’s as simple as an occasional check in at a weather station in your area to see that it has not been destroyed, stolen, or malfunctioning.

Your assistance will contribute to beneficial local research that will help to better understand weather, snow/ ice melt patterns, fruit set times for berries, and many other climate related indicators.

This is great experience for youth interested in pursuing careers in science, birdwatchers, hikers, berry pickers, and pretty much anyone who loves to be outdoors. You do not need to take on multiple stations or even go to one station multiple times, but the more help the better. Together if we each take a small walk once every week or so we will be able to better understand our climate and how it is changing on a large scale. Many hands make light work!

To join our team of volunteers or to ask questions and give feedback please contact:

Jasmine Pinksen
jasminepinksen@gmail.com
709-649-8802

Ms. Monique Carroll of the Qalipu Mi’Kmaq, receives a special award for support to the Reserve Force during the Canadian Forces Liaison Council Awards Ceremony at Cartier Square Drill Hall on May 9th, 2019.

The Canadian Armed Forces recognize employers and educators from across Canada for outstanding support to their employees and students who serve as reservists. Their support allows Canadian Armed Forces to fulfill its commitment under Canada’s Defence Policy Strong, Secure, Engaged and generate full-time capability through a Reserve Force providing part-time service.

l-r: Brigadier-General Liam McGarry, Chief of Staff Army Operations, Ms. Monique Carroll, Lieutenant-Colonel Kevin Bond, Mr. Bill Mahoney.

Photo Credit: Corporal Lisa Fenton
Canadian Forces Support Unit (Ottawa) Imaging Services
© 2019 DND-MDN Canada SU06-2019-0329-007
(L-R) Brigadier-General Liam McGarry, Chief of Staff Army Operations, Monique Carroll, Director of Education and Training Department, nominator Lieutenant-Colonel Kevin Bond, Provincial Chair Mr. Bill Mahoney, Chief Warrant Officer Kent Clapham, Army Reserve Sergeant Major

Qalipu First Nation Receives Special Award for Support of Black Bear Program

May 27, 2019 Corner Brook— Qalipu First Nation was recently recognized as a committed supporter of
Reservists in the Canadian Armed Forces and received the Special Award for support to the Reserve
Force on May 9, 2019 during a formal ceremony at the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa.

The nomination was made by Lieutenant-Colonel Kevin Bond, Royal Newfoundland Regiment, in
acknowledgement of QFN’s work in hosting information sessions to help raise awareness of the Black
Bear Program, a summer program geared primarily toward Indigenous youth. In the nomination, Bond
noted “As Qalipu Chief, Chief Brendan Mitchell is committed to the ongoing development of Qalipu on
behalf of his community. He promotes positive change in fostering a prosperous tomorrow for all
especially the youth in the Qalipu community. He was very quick to seize the opportunity to promote
the Black Bear program as a source of employment for youth and at the same time promote indigenous
culture.”

Chief Brendan Mitchell was unable to attend the awards ceremony in Ottawa. The Chief was
represented by Monique Carroll, Director of Education and Training. Carroll and her staff led the
Black Bear promotion initiative, brining information sessions across all the Wards.

Carroll said, “we are always looking for partnerships that will help us deliver more education,
training and employment opportunities to our people. The Black Bear Program provides great pay,
covers meals, accommodations and travel and positive cultural experiences along with basic military
training. We want young people to know about these opportunities, we want them to succeed. We
were pleased to partner with the Canadian Armed Forces to do this.”

Reflecting on the award, Chief Brendan Mitchell noted, “we had four indigenous people from
Newfoundland take part in the Black Bear Program in 2018. This was the first summer for
participation by Newfoundland’s Indigenous youth. For some, this was an important step in
recognizing their own potential and dreams. We expect to see much greater Newfoundland
representation at Black Bear this coming summer. We will continue to work with the Canadian Armed
Forces to bring opportunity to our youth and others”.

Members are invited to keep an eye out for education, employment and training opportunities, like
Black Bear, on the Band’s Education and Training Facebook page.

A person holding a Red Apple with engraved heart

Health & Social Division at Qalipu First Nation

The Health and Social Division at Qalipu strives to improve the lives and wellbeing of our members and communities.  We promote health education, active living, mental health, and spiritual and cultural practices in all our programs and services.  We take a holistic approach; the health and wellbeing of our members is important to us.

Non-Insured Health Benefits (NIHB) Program

Currently Qalipu coordinates and oversees the administration of the Medical Transportation Benefit, and the Mental Health Counselling Benefit.  The division continues to set goals that will see the transfer of additional Non-Insured Health Benefits from Indigenous Services Canada to the Band.  This continued growth will allow for greater capacity and expertise within the Band, our province, more employment opportunities, and improved response times.

We have staff in various office locations to help you navigate and understand your health benefits.  Please contact us.

NIHB Support Specialists: Ensure membership reimbursements are screened, scanned and directed in timely and effective manner.  Prepare preapprovals for Mental Health and Medical Transportation Benefit. Coordination of travel and accommodations for medical appointments, assess and process reimbursements. 

Grand Falls – Windsor Office
Susan Bryan
709-393-7770
sbryan@qalipu.ca
Glenwood Office
Jasmine Collis
709-679-2238
jcollis@qalipu.ca
Stephenville Office (rear entrance)
Melissa Sullivan
709-643-2456
msullivan@qalipu.ca
Corner Brook Office
Megan Blanchard
709-634-5078
mablanchard@qalipu.ca
Corner Brook Office
Natasha Lavers
709-634-5042
nlavers@qalipu.ca

NIHB Navigator: Ensures broadest possible access and understanding of the NIHB program, educates membership and communities on their benefits, advocates and liaise on behalf of membership  with respect to health benefits.

Howard Thistle
709-679-5743 or 855-675-5743
hthistle@qalipu.ca


Manager of Health Services:
Provides leadership to the Health and Social Division, builds partnerships and collaborations, increases capacities and addresses concerns.

Mitch Blanchard
709-634-8046
mblanchard@qalipu.ca

Piping Clover

Piping Plover 2018-2019 Update from the Natural Resources Department

The piping plover is an endangered ground nesting shorebird that inhabits our shores from late spring until early fall. Plovers can be found on mostly sandy beaches (with some larger grain and smaller rock) and in coastal dunes where vegetation is sparse and mostly limited to grasses. This year, Qalipu continued its monitoring of the Piping plover (Charadrius melodus melodus) in the Bay St. George region. We returned to the same sites which we have been surveying the past number of years; Sandy Point, Flat Bay Peninsula, Stephenville Crossing, and Black Bank.

During the 2018-2019 field season a total of twelve individuals were spotted at Flat Bay and Sandy Point combined including seven chicks, and seven adults, four of which made up two breeding pairs. At Black Bank, a total of ten individuals were spotted consisting of four chicks and six adults, four of which made up two breeding pairs. The piping plover chicks and two breeding pairs that were spotted at Black bank were only seen once. The fate of the chicks could not be confirmed at any of the locations.

It is important to remember that the same beaches in which piping plover inhabit are one’s that are favorable to recreational activities (riding ATVs, sun bathing, swimming, beach fires, etc.).  This can make things difficult for preventing disturbance of the species during their nesting period. There are some preventative measures we can take when using beaches that have suitable piping plover habitat or are inhabited by piping plovers. The following list of recommendations is collected from Environment and Climate Change Canada’s promotional materials:

  • Between April and August stay away from recognized piping plover breeding and nesting areas. Walk on the wet sand, close to the water’s edge.
  • Keep your pets on a leash. Wandering pets can disturb nesting birds and be significantly harmful to chicks and fledglings
  • Clean up garbage found on the beach and if you pack it in, pack it out. Food wrapping and waste can attract scavenging predators
  • Leave natural debris on the beach as piping plovers rely on these resources for food and cover. These include seaweed, shells, and woody debris
  • Do not operate any vehicles on beaches or coastal dunes. Doing so can disturb nesting plovers, cause chicks to get stuck in tire ruts and separated from their mothers, crush eggs/chicks, and in the case of riding in dunes, accelerate coastal erosion in the area and cause permanent habitat loss.
  • Report the location of piping plovers and their nests to the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) or Qalipu Fisheries Guardians
  • If you see people, or pets disturbing piping plovers or their nests, contact CWS to report the disturbance. It’s a federal offence under the Species at Risk Act to harass species at risk.

Join a local stewardship group or volunteer organization to help protect species at risk and talk to others about these best practices to help protect our species at risk.  You can contact CWS for more information on Piping Plover groups in your local area

Summer holidays and teenage concept - group of smiling teenagers with skateboard hanging out outside.

Successful Businesses for the Youth Summer Employment Program 2019

The Youth Summer Employment Program provides wage support to community organizations who, in turn, provide indigenous youth with meaningful employment and skills.

Businesses are selected from each of the nine Wards, and one recipient is chosen from locations outside the Wards as well.

Indigenous youth can apply directly to these businesses who are successful recipients of the Youth Summer Employment Program.

Notice

Absence from Office for Corner Brook Ward

The Qalipu First Nation wishes to advise its membership that effective April 18, 2019 the Ward Councilor for the Corner Brook Ward, Brian Dicks, has been granted a thirty day leave of absence and will not be available for regular duties of the Ward Councilor.

A Corner Brook Ward meeting took place on March 5, 2019 and will occur again as usual in the Fall.

The Corner Brook Membership Orientation session will go ahead as planned 7:00 PM on April 24 at Bennett Hall-Masonic Hall with the support of staff and other members of the Council in the western region.

This leave of absence is supported by the Chief and Council.

Members from the Corner Brook Ward are encouraged to contact their Vice Chief Keith Cormier or Chief Brendan Mitchell if they have questions, concerns, or wish to connect during this absence from office for the Corner Brook Ward Councilor.